UNDER A BLACK SKY by Inger Wolf (Review)

Inger Wolf’s Under a Black Sky is a fairly standard police procedural but with an unusual and dramatic setting and an even more unusual protagonist that I for one definitely want to see more of.

It is apparently part of a series written in Danish and featuring the Danish Detective Daniel Trokics, but he is not the unusual protagonist I mean. No, what makes this one special for me is, as I say, the setting, in Alaska – quite different from cosy little Denmark – and the other detective, the one in charge of this case, a woman named Angie Johnson.

Trokics has been sent to Anchorage to observe (and assist?) because the victims in the multiple murder were a Danish family, and a Danish child, eleven-year-old Marie, is missing, presumably kidnapped, because her body was not there with those of the rest of the family. The scenes where we see things from Marie’s viewpoint are moving and well-written, but I found Trokics boring and cold and I don’t see how any reader, male or female, could ever identify with him. Me, I was there with Angie from the very first moment and was still with her in the hospital room in Alaska when Trokics had left her and returned to Denmark.

So, what I would like to see, dear Inger, is a series of books featuring Angie Johnson. She is definitely the most interesting and sympathetic police detective I have come across in years of reading murder mysteries – with the possible exception of Miss Smilla (Smilla Qaaviqaaq Jaspersen, in Miss Smilla’s Feeling for Snow), who, curiously, is another Danish creation and of very similar mixed parentage.

I thought I had reviewed that wonderful story in this site but find now that I haven’t. I will post a review of it as soon as I can – but don’t wait! If you haven’t read it, read it. Both these books are highly recommended.