C. S. Lewis on Science Fiction

[Science fiction] really does deal with issues far more serious than those realistic fiction deals with; real problems about human destiny and so on. Do you remember that story about the man who meets a female monster landed from another planet with all its cubs hanging round it? It’s obviously starving, and he offers them thing after thing to eat; they immediately vomit it up, until one of the young fastens on him, begins sucking his blood, and immediately begins to revive. This female creature is utterly unhuman, horrible in form; there’s a long moment when it looks at the man – they’re in a lonely place – and then very sadly it packs up its young, and goes back into its space-ship and goes away. Well now, you could not have a more serious theme than that. What is a footling story about some pair of human lovers compared with that?

Quote from THE WEIRD SISTERS

Came across this short passage from The Weird Sisters and want to share it. Haven’t read the book yet, but I plan to!

“She remembered one of her boyfriends asking, offhandedly, how many books she read in a year. “A few hundred,” she said.
“How do you have the time?” he asked, gobsmacked.
She narrowed her eyes and considered the array of potential answers in front of her. Because I don’t spend hours flipping through cable complaining there’s nothing on? Because my entire Sunday is not eaten up with pre-game, in-game, and post-game talking heads? Because I do not spend every night drinking overpriced beer and engaging in dick-swinging contests with the other financirati? Because when I am waiting in line, at the gym, on the train, eating lunch, I am not complaining about the wait/staring into space/admiring myself in reflective surfaces? I am reading!
“I don’t know,” she said, shrugging.”

Trading Places

No time for reviews at the moment, but I couldn’t resist this question when I happened upon it.

And the answer is … Now, this evening, Jayne Lyons, in The Medievalist. She time-travels back to the 15th century and meets and falls in love with Richard III. I have just finished re-reading Josephine Tey’s The Daughter of Time, the best investigation into the murder of the Princes in the Tower ever written and will review it here asap. Suffice it to say that I would give anything (almost) to be in Jayne Lyons’ place right now!