A PLAY OF LORDS by Margaret Frazer

The Fourth in the “Joliffe” series of Medieval Mysteries

England, the autumn of 1435 

‘Lord Lovell’s players, come to play for his grace the bishop of Winchester!’

The guards gave no sign of being impressed. Their cool, disinterested glance at hamper and players said that far more important people than Lord Lovell’s players came their way every day.

Joliffe did not doubt it. Bishop Beaufort – the bastard son of a royal Duke of Lancaster – was not only bishop of Winchester but cardinal of England and the present king’s great-uncle, a power in England’s government these twenty years and more and very possibly the wealthiest man in either of the king’s realms of France and England. Certainly he was the man who loaned the royal government far more money than anyone else was able to, with sometimes his loans the only thing that kept the war in France possible. Through King Henry’s infancy and young boyhood, Bishop Beaufort and his nephew John, duke of Bedford, had, between them, held the ambitions of John’s brother, the duke of Gloucester, in check; but Bedord was now dead, the war in France was in the worst trouble there had been since the burning of the French witch Jeanne d’Arc five years ago, and Joliffe expected that the king, at almost fourteen years of age, was probably beginning to have a mind of his own, let alone whatever the Duke of Gloucester was now up to, and all in all, life must presently be very interesting for Bishop Beaufort of Winchester, cardinal of England.

The fourth book in this series featuring the player and playwright Joliffe (an off-shoot of the Dame Frevisse series of medieval mysteries – they know each other and have appeared in a couple of books together) is set in London in the autumn of 1335. The Duke of Bedford, chief advisor to the still under-age Henry VI, is dead, and the nobles and bishops are scheming and plotting and jostling each other for positions of power around the boy-king.

Meanwhile, in France, the Duke of Burgundy has reneged on his alliance with England and joined forces with the king of France, thus rendering all Burgundians in England the object of jingoistic hatred. Some are killed by mobs – but are these riots spontaneous or is someone stirring up trouble?

Joliffe and the players find themselves “lent” to Cardinal Beaufort by their own master, Lord Lovell. And Beaufort, son of John o’ Gaunt, grandson of Edward III, and great-uncle of the king, commissions Joliffe to write a play which will influence public opinion against France rather than Burgundy. He also wants Joliffe to act as his spy when the company visit the great houses of other magnates and rich London merchants to perform their play.

Then the players are attacked. And someone is killed …

Hobnobbing with royals and moving with the currents of high society (something Dame Frevisse is well acquainted with – indeed has deliberately turned her back on) is new for Joliffe. As one might expect of such a talented actor and improvisor, he does it very well.

All in all, this is one of the best of this great double series.

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