A PLAY OF DUX MORAUD by Margaret Frazer

The Second in the “Joliffe” series of Medieval Mysteries. England, 1434

He was on the curve of the stairs beyond sight of anyone at their head or foot when he met Mariena coming up. In the stone-walled narrowness he stepped as much aside as he could, flattening his back to the wall to let her pass. Though she had to turn sideways, too, there was room for her to pass without touching him but she did – and more than touched. She brushed her body, her breasts, and hips across his, for a moment paused with her fine-boned, beautiful face upturned to his, her lips slightly parted, inviting a kiss he might have given except that he was so startled he only stared at her in the instant before her gaze fell and she went on, with the slightest of smiles at the corner of her mouth and a sidelong look back at him from under her lowered lids before the curve of the stairs took her from sight.

Swallowing thickly, shaken by how easily she had raised him, he went uncomfortably downward, only to meet Sia on the last curve of the stairs. He would rather not have dealt with her just then and would have gone past when she stepped aside, out of his way, but she put out her arm, barring him from going down, and said, ‘She was waiting for you, you know.’

‘And so were you,’ Joliffe said lightly; and because Sia was almost as near to him as Mariena had been and her face was turned up to him the same way, he kissed her. The kiss turned into more than he had meant it to be, with Sia’s arms coming around his waist and her body leaning into his, pressing him back against the wall.

He was the first to break it off, but Sia, still leaning against him, smiled up into his face with a sigh of satisfaction. ‘There now,’ she said. ‘That’s better.’ 

This is the second in the series of books by Margaret Frazer in which Joliffe takes over from Dame Frevisse, and it follows straight on from A Play of Isaac. The players – now Lord Lovell’s Players – are sent by their new patron to entertain the guests at the wedding of Sir Edward Deneby’s daughter Mariena. A wedding gift.

But there is more to it than that. Mariena’s previous fiancé had died in what may well have been suspicious circumstances, and Lord Lovell for one is suspicious enough to want to know more. So he commissions Joliffe, whose powers of observation and deduction he has come to respect, to see if all is as well beneath the surface as appearances may lead one to believe.

I like these Joliffe books very much. I prefer them to her other, Dame Frevisse, novels. Not only are they well-written and beautifully constructed (as are the Dame Frevisse novels, of course) but it is a sexy story, which the Frevisse stories definitely are not. Margaret Frazer seemed to find Joliffe liberating. Is it just that things happen to him that would never – could never – happen to Dame Frevisse?

Mariena, Sia tells him, ‘heats men to where they don’t know whether they’re coming or going. Never satisfies them, just heats them. They’re easy to have then […] These past few years, while she’s had suitors here now and again, some of us have gathered a pretty lot of coins helping them ease their longings. If you know what I mean.’

He’d have to be both gelded and stupid not to know what she meant and he said, smiling, ‘I’m no wealthy suitor come to woo. I’ve no coins to give you.’

‘You’re fair-bodied enough with a face I don’t mind kissing’ – Sia slipped free of his hands, came close, and kissed him again to prove it – ‘that I’ll have you for my own pleasure and no need for coins.’

Enough was enough – ‘ [When Dame Frevisse had decided enough was enough, that was it. This, however, continues] and he’d not had nearly enough. ‘Where?’ he asked. ‘And when?’ Since here and now clearly did not suit.

‘Tonight after supper. There’s a loft above the cow-byre. Behind the stables. Can you find it?’

Or is it that identifying with her virile male hero, she sees the world quite differently. Suddenly the women are all sex-objects.

Joliffe is great, and I love the detailed background of medieval drama and stagecraft and the lives of the players.

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