Trading Places

31 05 2018

No time for reviews at the moment, but I couldn’t resist this question when I happened upon it.

And the answer is … Now, this evening, Jayne Lyons, in The Medievalist. She time-travels back to the 15th century and meets and falls in love with Richard III. I have just finished re-reading Josephine Tey’s The Daughter of Time, the best investigation into the murder of the Princes in the Tower ever written and will review it here asap. Suffice it to say that I would give anything (almost) to be in Jayne Lyons’ place right now!

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Quotations on History

21 05 2018

charles french words reading and writing

MichaelCrichton_2

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“If you don’t know history, then you don’t know anything. You are a leaf that doesn’t know it is part of a tree. ”

                                                                         Michael Crichton

George_Santayana

(https://en.wikipedia.org)

“Those who do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it.”

                                                                         George Santayana

georgeorwell

(https://pixabay.com)

“The most effective way to destroy people is to deny and obliterate their own understanding of their history.”

                                                                        George Orwell

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Synthetic

6 05 2018

I just discovered this poem – and this site.

Words Becoming

Overwhelming self-loathing

debilitates and smears

a synthetic human

into a state of nothing.

Avoiding confrontation

she harms herself,

realising she is not

worthy of the words her

alter ego spews.

She loves

fiction too deeply

because she is not in it.

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Our discount tents …

6 05 2018

Speaking of Richard III (previous post), I love this sign in a camping-goods shop window – in Leicester, naturally!

Shakespeare would turn in his grave. No, perhaps he would love it, too.





TO THE TOWER BORN by Robin Maxwell

6 05 2018

England, 1483

Bessie’s mother was bristling with indignation, but there was, underneath it, all-encompassing fear. News of Lord Hastings’s horrific execution for plotting the protector’s downfall had unnerved her. Clearly Richard of Gloucester was capable of anything. And now he had come to Westminster Sanctuary demanding an audience.

‘What can I do but see him?’ she said to Bessie as she checked her image in the looking glass. ‘If I do not, he will break the sanctuary of the church, breach the walls, and come in by force.’

But Bessie had heard the other side of her mother’s logic. Afraid of the Duke of Gloucester as she was, she trusted him in one important respect. She believed that Richard would do anything to place his brother’s son on the English throne. And was that not what she herself wanted above all?

Bessie had begged her mother to allow her to be present at the audience, and appraising her eldest daughter quickly and finding the eighteen-year-old as much of an ally as she was likely to find, the queen had agreed.

‘Let him come in,’ announced the queen dowager.

And in he came.

I first read this book several years ago and have just re-read it, and have been wondering all over again how it is that Richard III gets so much attention and so many books written about him considering that he was king for less than two years.

Shakespeare depicted him as an evil hunchback who murdered his way to the throne, another MacBeth, but worse; and this is the image most people have of him. However, more recently many books have appeared, both fiction and non-fiction, defending Richard, and it is obviously true that Richard was the victim of Tudor propaganda to the effect that he usurped the throne, done in order to draw attention away from Henry Tudor’s usurpation.

Still, it must have been obvious to most people at the time that while Henry Tudor had seized by force of arms a throne to which he had no claim whatsoever, Richard may not have been a usurper at all if his nephews, the two young princes, were genuinely illegitimate (and it seems that they were) and the crown was thrust upon him by the Church and what passed for a government. Richard had had no intention of seizing the throne: he it was who proclaimed Edward King as Edward V and arranged for his coronation.

Then the princes disappeared.

And nothing has been heard of them since (unless you believe the claims of poor Perkin Warbeck). The much-vaunted bones discovered in the Tower were just some among many, and even Sir Thomas More, who pointed the way to the site of the boys’ captivity, said the boys had been taken from the Tower before their death.

A mystery indeed.

Robin Maxwell presents a new solution – which I cannot of course give away. Enough to say that her Richard is neither the tragic hero of Daughter of Time, We Speak No Treason, The Midnight King, The Medievalist, etc, nor the villain of Shakespeare and conservative historians. He is weak and vacillating, a tool in the hands of treacherous men like Buckingham and Margaret Beaufort’s husband Lord Stanley. I like this. To me it rings true.

I also like very much the depiction of the friendship between Princess Bessie (Elizabeth of York, Edward IV’s eldest child, who at the age of eighteen was possibly the most eligible princess in the world, then suddenly finds herself declared illegitimate, a nobody) and Nell Caxton, independent and highly educated only child of  the man who introduced the printing-press to Britain and printed the first books in English. The story is told through the eyes of those two wonderful girls, Bessie and Nell, and it will be very hard ever to see that episode again through any other eyes.





PARDONABLE LIES by Jacqueline Winspear

30 04 2018

London and France, 1930

The dating of this book, 1930, is deceptive, for it is very much a post-WW1 novel, and a very good one. It catches the spirit of that time, when all had lost someone and many still suffered, those so wounded mentally or physically as to be unable to take any part in post-war life, those who did go on with that life despite the mental and physical traumas. It was a horrible period.

The heroine herself, Maisie Dobbs, was a nurse at Verdun, an experience from which she has never fully recovered, psychologically. She also lost her fiancé, who is still “alive” in a home somewhere, a vegetable … So when she is asked to find out whether a Flying Corps officer, officially declared dead twelve years ago after his plane crashed in France, is really dead, she accepts the task – especially as a thirteen-year-old girl whose own father was killed in the war and who is now accused of murdering her “uncle” and pimp, needs a good lawyer. Maisie’s client, the father of the missing airman, happens to be one of the best barristers in the country, and he agrees reluctantly to defend the girl if Maisie agrees to investigate the death of his son.

A rich friend of Maisie’s asks her, while she’s about it, to see if she can find out anything more about her two beloved elder brothers, both killed in action.

All this, of course, involves returning to France and the scenes of her nightmares.

It is all very moving, very real, and very well written. And Maisie herself is a young lady you will definitely identify with, if you are anything like me.

There is apparently a whole series of books featuring Maisie Dobbs out there and I’m going to be on the look-out for them from now on as I browse the shelves (and cardboard boxes) of my favourite second-hand bookshops.





The Sexual Predator Award

30 04 2018